Click here to see all Summit Medical Group pages

Click here to return to SMG Sports Medicine Services

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Click to view Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Practitioners

B

Barmakian, Joseph T., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 574 Springfield Avenue, Westfield
Boretz, Robert S., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 215 Union Avenue, Suite B, Bridgewater
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

F

Fischer, Evan S., MD Hand Surgery 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston
103 Park Street, Montclair
Fox, Ross J., MD, FAAOS Hand Surgery 75 Bloomfield Avenue, Denville
385 Morris Avenue, Springfield

G

Garberina, Matthew J., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 1 Diamond Hill Road, Berkeley Heights
Garcia, Jason P., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 741 Northfield Avenue, West Orange

K

Kanellakos, James G., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph
Kavanagh, Mark L., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 6 Brighton Road, Clifton
61 Beaverbrook Road, Lincoln Park
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

M

Momeni, Reza, MD, FACS Plastic Surgery 1 Diamond Hill Road, Berkeley Heights
75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston

N

Niver, Genghis E., MD Hand Surgery 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
Nordstrom, Thomas J., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 215 Union Avenue, Suite B, Bridgewater

R

Rizio, Louis, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston
Rombough, Gary R., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 33 North Fullerton Avenue, Montclair
Rosa, Richard A., MD, FACS Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 741 Northfield Avenue, West Orange

S

Schmid, Daniel, B., MD Plastic Surgery 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston
131 Madison Avenue, Morristown

T

Terry, Alon, MD Physiatry 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
Thrower, Albert B., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 574 Springfield Avenue, Westfield

W

Wagshul, Adam D., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

key facts about carpal tunnel syndrome

  • Click to enlarge Carpal tunnel syndrome is most likely caused by pressure, irritation, swelling, or blood flow problems in the carpal tunnel damage of the median nerve. Irritation and swelling is caused by repeated motions over time.
  • You may have a higher risk of carpal tunnel syndrome if someone in your family has this problem, or if you are pregnant, or if you have a disease like arthritis, diabetes, or a thyroid problem.
  • The main symptoms are pain, numbness, or tingling in your hand and wrist, especially in the thumb and the index and middle fingers. ​These symptoms may come and go, get worse the more you use your hand, be worse at night, feel better if you shake your hand and wrist, or your hand may feel weak and it may be hard to grip things.

what is carpal tunnel syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is problem with pain, numbness, and tingling in your wrist and hand. The carpal tunnel is a narrow space in your forearm and the palm of your hand. It is made up of bone and other tissue. The median nerve passes through the carpal tunnel to your thumb, index finger, and middle finger.

how is carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosed and treated?

A Summit Medical Group hand and wrist specialist will examine the hand, wrist and fingers to make an initial assessment. Typically, he or she will tap the middle of your inner wrist or ask you to bend your wrist down for 1 minute to see if either of these tests causes pain or tingling and will recommend a combination of X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs to determine the exact extent of your condition. Your care team may refer you to a specialist for tests to check your nerves. Our Orthopedics and Sports Medicine center offers all of these services under one roof. 

If you have a disease that may be causing carpal tunnel syndrome, like arthritis, diabetes, or a thyroid problem, treating the disease may help your symptoms.

To relieve pressure on the nerve, your healthcare team may suggest that you:

  • Rest your hand and wrist and avoid activities that may make your symptoms worse.
  • Wear a wrist splint to avoid more damage from twisting or bending.

In some cases your care team may prescribe medicine for pain and swelling or give a shot of steroid or numbing medicine into your wrist. Your healthcare team may recommend physical therapy including stretching and strengthening exercises to help you heal. Your care team may also recommend surgery if your symptoms don’t get better with these treatments.

how can i manage carpal tunnel syndrome?

Some of the things you can do to help your symptoms include:

  • Put your arm up on pillows when you sit or lie down.
  • If your work involves using tools, try using a different tool, or try to use the other hand instead.

Because the exact cause of carpal tunnel syndrome is not well understood, it can be hard to prevent. Here are some things you can do that may help:

  • Make sure that your hands and wrists are supported when you use them, especially if you do repetitive work. For example, when you are typing or using a mouse at a computer, make sure your workstation is set up in the proper position and that your hands are comfortably supported in front of the keyboard. It may help to use a pad that is specially designed to give this kind of support. Also check to see that your forearms are at the same level as your keyboard.
  • Make sure that the tools you use are not too large for your hand. Try to use tools with a cushioned grip, or wear gloves when you use them. Some workplaces provide tools or equipment that may help you avoid carpal tunnel syndrome. Ask your employer about this.
  • Take frequent breaks from your work and do carpal tunnel exercises.

Source: Content is adapted from our Live Well Library, developed by RelayHealth. Copyright ©2014 McKesson Corporation and/or one of its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.

NAVIGATION WE ARE HERE TO HELP YOU! STAY CONNECTED Like Tweet Share Pin it Follow