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Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Spur) Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Spur)

Click to view Plantar Fasciitis (Heel Spur) Practitioners

A

Abrutyn, David A., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 215 Union Avenue, Suite B, Bridgewater
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren
Adam, Stephanie P., DO Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park

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Garcia, Jason P., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 741 Northfield Avenue, West Orange

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Ibarbia, Jose D., MD Physiatry 6 Brighton Road, Clifton

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Kavanagh, Mark L., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 6 Brighton Road, Clifton
61 Beaverbrook Road, Lincoln Park
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren
Kocaj, Stephen, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park

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Rombough, Gary R., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 33 North Fullerton Avenue, Montclair
Rosa, Richard A., MD, FACS Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 741 Northfield Avenue, West Orange
Rubman, Marc H., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph

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Siegel, Jeffrey A., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph

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Terry, Alon, MD Physiatry 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park

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Wagshul, Adam D., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

key facts about plantar fasciitis

  • Click to enlarge Plantar fasciitis can be caused by frequent impact to the heel, such as running, jumping, walking, or stair-climbing.
  • If you wear high-heeled shoes, including western-style boots, the fascia can get shorter, causing pain when you stretch the foot during normal activities.
  • If arches of your foot are unusually high or low, you are more likely to develop it.

what is plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is a painful irritation of the tissue on the bottom of your foot between the ball of the foot and the heel. If you are a runner, you may get plantar fasciitis when you start running further during each workout or if you run more often. It can also happen if you start running on a different surface or in different terrain, or if your shoes are worn out and don't give enough cushioning for your heels. In addition, it can be caused by wearing high heels for long periods of time, or by gaining weight, because these factors place extra stress on your feet. 

how is plantar fasciitis diagnosed and treated?

A Summit Medical Group foot specialist will examine the foot and heel to make an initial assessment. Typically, he or she will recommend a combination of X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs to determine the exact extent of the damage. Our Orthopedics and Sports Medicine center offers all of these services under one roof. 

  • Give your painful heel lots of rest. You will need to change or stop doing the activities that cause pain until your foot has healed. You may need to stay completely off your foot for several days when the pain is severe.
  • Your healthcare team may also recommend physical therapy and stretching and strengthening exercises to help you heal. 
  • In addition, we may recommend shoe inserts called arch supports or orthotics. 
  • Your care team may also give you a steroid injection for relief of pain and swelling. 
  • With treatment, plantar fasciitis may take up to several months to heal. You may find that the pain comes and goes. Talk to your healthcare team if you do not feel improvement with treatment.

how can i manage plantar fasciitis?

To help relieve pain:

  • Rest your heel on an ice pack, gel pack, or package of frozen vegetables wrapped in a cloth every 3 to 4 hours for up to 20 minutes at a time.
  • Keep your foot up on a pillow when you sit or lie down.
  • Take nonprescription pain medicine, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen. Read the label and take as directed. Unless recommended by your healthcare provider, do not take an NSAID for more than 10 days.

Source: Content is adapted from our Live Well Library, developed by RelayHealth. Copyright ©2014 McKesson Corporation and/or one of its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.

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