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Tennis/Golfer's Elbow Tennis/Golfer's Elbow

Click to view Tennis/Golfer's Elbow Practitioners

A

Abrutyn, David A., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 215 Union Avenue, Suite B, Bridgewater
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

B

Black, Eric M., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
574 Springfield Avenue, Westfield
Boretz, Robert S., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 215 Union Avenue, Suite B, Bridgewater
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

C

Cappadona, Joseph, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 61 Beaverbrook Road, Lincoln Park

F

Fischer, Evan S., MD Hand Surgery 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston
103 Park Street, Montclair
Fox, Ross J., MD, FAAOS Hand Surgery 75 Bloomfield Avenue, Denville
385 Morris Avenue, Springfield

G

Garberina, Matthew J., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 1 Diamond Hill Road, Berkeley Heights
Garcia, Jason P., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 741 Northfield Avenue, West Orange
Gold, David A., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 61 Beaverbrook Road, Lincoln Park

I

Ibarbia, Jose D., MD Physiatry 6 Brighton Road, Clifton

K

Kanellakos, James G., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph
Kavanagh, Mark L., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 6 Brighton Road, Clifton
61 Beaverbrook Road, Lincoln Park
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren
Kocaj, Stephen, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park

M

Momeni, Reza, MD, FACS Plastic Surgery 1 Diamond Hill Road, Berkeley Heights
75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston

N

Niver, Genghis E., MD Hand Surgery 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
Nordstrom, Thomas J., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 215 Union Avenue, Suite B, Bridgewater

R

Rao, Rajesh, MD Physiatry 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren
574 Springfield Avenue, Westfield
Rizio, Louis, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 75 E. Northfield Road, Livingston
Rombough, Gary R., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 33 North Fullerton Avenue, Montclair
Rosa, Richard A., MD, FACS Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 741 Northfield Avenue, West Orange
Rubman, Marc H., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph

S

Shindle, Michael, MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
Siegel, Jeffrey A., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph

T

Terry, Alon, MD Physiatry 140 Park Avenue, Florham Park
Thrower, Albert B., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 574 Springfield Avenue, Westfield

W

Wagshul, Adam D., MD Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 261 James Street, Morristown
50 Cherry Hill Road, Parsippany
121 Center Grove Road, Randolph
34 Mountain Boulevard, Warren

key facts about tennis/golfer's elbow

  • Click to enlarge Tennis elbow is usually caused by activities that overuse the tendons and muscles in your forearm, limiting your ability to straighten and raise your hand and wrist without pain.
  • You may also experience shooting pain from the elbow down into the forearm or up into the upper arm associated with making a fist, gripping an object, shaking hands, or turning door handles.
  • In severe cases, you may need surgery to repair the tendon.

what is tennis/golfer's elbow?

Tennis elbow is a problem with the tendons that attach the bony bump at the outer side of your elbow with the muscles in your forearm and wrist. You use these muscles and tendons when you bend your wrist backward. This problem can be caused by activities such tennis and other racket sports, golf, carpentry, machine work, computer work, and knitting. Tennis elbow may also be caused by a sudden injury that twists or tears your tendon.

You can have tiny or partial tears in your tendon. If you have a complete tear of your tendon, it is called a rupture. Tennis elbow is also called lateral epicondylitis, elbow tendinopathy, tendinosis, or wrist extensor tendinopathy.

how is tennis/golfer's elbow diagnosed and treated?

A Summit Medical Group elbow specialist will examine the elbow and and tendons to make an initial assessment. Typically, he or she will recommend a combination of X-rays, CT scans, and MRIs to determine the exact extent of your condition. Our Orthopedics and Sports Medicine center offers all of these services under one roof. 

  • You will need to change or stop doing the activities that cause pain until the tendon has healed. For example, you will need to avoid racket sports, golfing, hammering, or unscrewing jars until your symptoms go away. If you play tennis, you may need to use a tennis racket with a larger grip or change the way you hold or swing your racket, or get exercise by walking or running instead of playing tennis. Try to lift objects with your palm facing up to keep from overusing the tendons and muscles in your arm.
  • Your healthcare team may recommend stretching and strengthening exercises to help you heal.
  • You may need to put an elastic bandage around the elbow, or a strap just below the tender spot on the elbow.
  • If the pain does not go away, your care team may give you a shot of a steroid medicine.
  • In severe cases, you may need surgery to repair the tendon.
  • The pain often gets better within a few weeks with self-care, but some injuries may take several months or longer to heal. It’s important to follow all of your healthcare team's instructions.

how can i manage tennis/golfer's elbow?

  • Follow your healthcare team's instructions, including any recommended physical therapy and exercises. 
  • To help relieve swelling and pain:
    • Put an ice pack, gel pack, or package of frozen vegetables wrapped in a cloth, on the area every 3 to 4 hours for up to 20 minutes at a time.
    • Do ice massage. To do this, first freeze water in a Styrofoam cup, then peel the top of the cup away to expose the ice. Hold the bottom of the cup and rub the ice over your tendon for 5 to 10 minutes. Do this several times a day while you have pain.
    • Take pain medicine, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or other medicine as directed by your provider. Read the label and take as directed. Unless recommended by your healthcare provider, do not take for more than 10 days.
    • Moist heat may help relax your muscles and make it easier to move your arm. Put moist heat on the injured area for 10 to 15 minutes at a time before you do warm-up and stretching exercises. Moist heat includes heat patches or moist heating pads that you can purchase at most drugstores, a wet washcloth or towel that has been heated in the dryer, or a hot shower. Don’t use heat if you have swelling.

Source: Content is adapted from our Live Well Library, developed by RelayHealth. Copyright ©2014 McKesson Corporation and/or one of its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.

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